Elder Law 101: Nursing Home Care vs. Assisted Living

How Do Nursing Homes Differ from Assisted Living

Nursing home lawyers provide assistance in making an advanced plan to get you care required as you get older or if you experience illnesses or injuries that make you unable to care for yourself any longer.  

As you experience age-related sickness or the affects of illness, there is a substantial chance you will some day require care in an institutional care environment.  

In fact, as Wall Street Journal explains, more than 70 percent of people who reach the age of 65 will require nursing home care at some point in the future.  

You’ll need to make sure you are prepared to move to the right environment — and to pay for the care you require.

Most nursing homes cost upwards of $5,000 a month for care.

The Weaver Firm attorneys can help you understand your options for nursing home care or other care you might require.

In particular, you should consider the differences between nursing homes and assisted living facilities so you can make a fully informed choice regarding which environment is right for you.

If you want help in understanding the different options for senior living when you cannot live alone any longer, you can give us a call at any time to talk with nursing home lawyers at our firm.

Assisted Living vs. Nursing Homes

Assisted living and nursing homes both provide an option for seniors who can no longer live independently but as the New York Times explains, there are important differences.

Assisted Living Facilities

Assisted living facilities generally provide a more home-like environment while nursing homes have a more institutional or hospital-like feel.

These homes may involve seniors living more independently in their own rooms or their own apartments, while nursing homes generally provide semi-private or private rooms with much less privacy and autonomy than assisted living facilities offer.

While an assisted living facility can feel more like living independently for seniors, this independence makes assisted living facilities unsuitable for many seniors who require more hands-on help.  

Assisted living facilities may offer housekeeping services, meals, activities, and some help getting medical care, assisted living facilities typically do not provide the same level of supportive services that a nursing home does. 

The New York Times also indicates that nursing homes are more heavily regulated than assisted living facilities. 

Assisted living facilities are covered by VA aid and attendance. The rules for this program are complex but are not nearly as intense as Medicaid rules.

Some facilities have an assisted living section and a nursing home care section for seniors who are attracted to the idea of assisted living but who may need nursing home care in the future.

If you think this could be an option, you should make sure to find out what the rules are for when and how different kinds of care can be paid for. 

Getting Help from Nursing Home Lawyers

How much does it cost to stay in a nursing home?

The average cost of a private room in a nursing home is more than $90,000 a year.

What are ways to pay for a nursing home stay?

There are four main ways to pay for a nursing home stay:

  1. Cash out of your pocket
  2. Medicaid
  3. Private Long Term Care Insurance
  4. Medicare

How does Medicaid pay?

Medicaid is a joint federal and state government program that helps people with low income and little assets pay for their nursing home cost.

Generally, to be eligible for Medicaid, your income and asset levels can’t exceed levels set forth in your state.

Medicaid officials will “look back” at your financial information over a certain number of years to determine if you have been getting rid of property in order to receive Medicaid.

However, if you have assets over the allowable level, you are permitted to “spend down” or decrease your assets before you receive Medicaid.

Typical spend down costs include medical expenses, mortgages and other debts, and funeral expenses.

Also, your house and car are generally not counted against you for qualification purposes, and therefore don’t have to be spent down.

States vary in their eligibility requirements, so you should check with your state social services office or an elder law attorney for specific information.

Also, keep in mind that not all nursing homes accept Medicaid, so you’ll need to ask about a particular nursing home’s policy. 

Nursing home lawyers at the Weaver Firm can provide assistance with the process of making a plan to get nursing home care or to get care in an assisted living community.

We can also provide guidance on reviewing nursing home facilities and assisted living facilities to find the right care environment for your particular circumstances.

Because the costs of care can be expensive and are not covered by Medicare or by most private insurance, we also provide assistance with the creation of a Medicaid plan so you can protect assets while getting Medicaid to cover the costs of your care. 

Contact us today at 817.638.9016 or RWeaver@weaverlegal.net

Nursing Home vs. Assisted Living: Who They Help

group photo canoeing down riverLawyers with experience in nursing home qualification, including those at the Weaver Firm, provide assistance in creating an advanced plan to get care you require as you get older or if you experience illnesses or injuries that make you unable to care for yourself any longer.  

As you experience age-related illness, there is a substantial chance you will some day require care in an institutional care environment. In fact, as Wall Street Journal explains, more than 70 percent of people who reach the age of 65 will require nursing home care at some point in the future.  

Start planning now. Medicaid has a five year loopback period for gifts. VA Aid and Attendance has NO LOOKBACK period as of this post, but changes are coming.

An attorney can help you to understand your options for nursing home care or other types of care

In particular, you should consider the differences between nursing homes and assisted living facilities so you can make a fully informed choice regarding which environment is right for you.

Assisted living vs. nursing home long-term care

Assisted living facilities and nursing homes both provide an option for seniors who can no longer live independently. But, as the New York Times explains, there are important differences:

  • Assisted living facilities generally provide a more home-like environment while nursing homes have a more institutional or hospital-like feel.  
  • Assisted living facilities involve seniors living more independently in their own rooms or their own apartments
  • Nursing homes generally provide semi-private or private rooms with much less privacy and autonomy than assisted living facilities offer.
  • Assisted living facility may offer housekeeping services, meals, activities, and some help getting medical care, assisted living facilities typically do not provide the same level of supportive services that a nursing home does. 

The New York Times also indicates that nursing homes are more heavily regulated than assisted living facilities.

Who pays for nursing home or other long-term care? 

  • Medicaid will cover the costs of nursing home care for eligible seniors who can qualify for means-tested benefits.
  • Assisted living facilities are often not covered by Medicaid or any other kind of insurance policy.
  • Assisted living facilities ARE covered by VA aid and attendance if you or your spouse was a veteran during time of war.
  • Some facilities have an assisted living section and a nursing home care section for seniors who are attracted to the idea of assisted living but who may need nursing home care in the future.

Getting help from nursing home lawyers

Because the costs of care are expensive and are not covered by Medicare or by most private insurance, our attorneys at the Weaver Firm provide assistance with the creation of a Medicaid or VA Aid and Attendance plan so you can protect assets while getting Medicaid or VA to cover the costs of your care.

Call 817-638-9016 today to schedule a meeting with Weaver Firm attorneys to review your options for long-term care.