Do I Owe Gift Taxes on Gifts from My Parents?

Nothing in life is as certain as death and taxes.

Do you owe tax on gifts from your parents?

Your parents have made wise financial decisions.

They now have a decent amount of money.

Maybe you are struggling a bit financially right now.

Maybe you are fine financially.

Either way, your parents gift you money.

Why?

Your parents love you.

Thanks, mom and dad . . . but . . . do I owe taxes on this gift?

The Short answer is NO.

Here’s Why?

These lifetime gifts made to you by your parents (or others) are not considered income to you.

As a result, the gifts will neither be taxed as income nor will they put you into a higher tax bracket.

Will you parents owe taxes?

Perhaps.

If they give more than the annual exclusion amount to an individual, then yes.

How much is the annual exclusion amount?

In 2018, it is $15,000.

They or you can give this amount to any number of people in a year. Gifts for all!

What if their gift exceeds this amount?

Your parent will need to file a gift tax return (Form 709) and claim any gift exceeding the exclusion amount as a reduction against his or her future estate tax exemption.

With the federal estate tax exemption now sitting at $11,220,000 per person in 2018, this will not likely be a problem.

YES . . .you can give away over 11 Million Dollars during your life and not pay taxes on those gifts.

Can your parent claim a deduction on a gift to you, your children, or anyone else?

Nope.

Deductions are allowed on charitable donations, but not on gifts to people.

To take a deduction on charitable donation, donations must be itemized.

Your parents should work with an experienced estate planning attorney to be sure their gifts align with their estate planning goals. 817.638.9016

How the Tax Plan Affects You in 2018

On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law new tax legislation (the “2017 Tax Bill”). The 2017 Tax Bill makes significant changes to the tax code, including a reduction in corporate tax rates, major changes to individual taxes, a repeal of the Health care mandate, and a number of other changes.

This update focuses on how this law affects individuals from an estate planning and tax perspective, including charitable gift planning, taxation of trusts and estates and asset transfers for planning purposes.

Estate Tax Exemption Doubles to Approximately US$11.2 million per Individual.

Rockefeller would be proud. The 2017 Tax Bill keeps the estate and gift tax at 40% but doubles the estate tax exemption to approximately US$11.2 million per individual (US$22.4 million per married couple), beginning on January 1, 2018. This increase also applies to the exemption from generation-skipping transfer (“GST”) tax, which also increases to US$11.2 million per individual (US$22.4 million per married couple). In layman’s terms, this means your estate will not pay taxes as long as it remains under $11.2 million. If you have a taxable estate, come see us right away so we can begin the planning process.

The other rules applicable to gift and estate taxation, such as heirs receiving fair market value basis for assets received from an estate, stay the same.

This US$11.2 million exemption will continue to be adjusted for inflation each year. Along with most other changes to the individual tax regime, this increased exemption is scheduled to expire after 2025. This increased exemption creates significant planning opportunities for individuals, particularly those with estates in excess of the increased limits. 

Clients Should Consider Using This Increased Exemption Starting in 2018

Clients should consider making gifts (either outright or in trust) in order to utilize this increased exemption, particularly since this increased exemption is scheduled to expire at the end of 2025. In addition, other estate planning techniques, such as GRATs and sales to grantor trusts, can still be used under the new 2017 Tax Law. 

Clients Should Review Current Estate Plans in Light of the Increased Exemption

One planning item to consider is that many clients have wills and other estate planning documents that use formulas based on the exemption amounts available at the client’s death. For example, an individual’s will may leave an amount equal to her available exemption from the estate tax to her children (either outright or in trust) and the balance over the exemption to her spouse. Without changing her documents, the change in the law increases the amount passing to the children and decreases the amount passing to her spouse by more than US$5 million. Accordingly, clients should review their current estate planning documents to ensure that their plans and these formulas still accurately reflect their wishes in light of the dramatically increased exemption amounts.

In addition, clients who live in New York State and whose estate planning documents fund trusts with the entire federal exemption amount may owe significant New York estate tax on the death of the first spouse and, therefore, may wish to review the structure of their estate plans. Clients living in other states that have state estate or inheritance taxes may also have similar tax considerations.

529 Plans May be Used for Educational Expenses for K-12 

The Tax Bill also expands the use of 529 plans so that they may be used for K-12 education. 529 plan funds (up to US$10,000 per year per beneficiary) can now also be used for tuition expenses for any elementary or secondary school, including public, private, or religious schools. Previous law only allowed 529 plan funds to be used for college and other post-secondary programs and expenses. A previous provision also allowed 529 plan funds to be used for homeschooling expenses, but that provision was removed from the final 2017 Tax Bill.

Limit on Deductions for Charitable Cash Contributions Increases to 60% of AGI

In addition, although the 2017 Tax Bill limits a number of income tax deductions, it does increase the deductibility limitation for cash contributions to public charities from 50% to 60% of adjusted gross income. This increase is scheduled to expire after 2025. Other charitable contributions (such as contributions of appreciated property and contributions to private foundations) are still subject to the 30% (and in some cases 20%) of adjusted gross income limitations, and the ability to carryover unused charitable contribution deductions for five years remains unchanged. 

Many Changes to Individual Taxation Also Affect Trusts and Estates, Including the New 20% Deduction for Certain “Pass-through” Income

Many of the changes to the taxation of individuals (e.g., reduction in tax rates, limitation on state and local income tax deductions, etc.) will also apply to trusts and estates. 

However, one change of particular importance for trusts and estates is the deduction for income received from pass-through entities. 

Under the 2017 Tax Bill, trusts and estates are entitled to take the 20% deduction for pass-through income also applicable to individuals, which creates an effective tax rate of 29.6% for most pass-through income earned by a trust. While beyond the scope of this discussion, certain restrictions apply to the availability of this deduction. It is important for trustees of trusts that own interests in pass-through entities to understand the effect of these rates on fiduciary income tax obligations. 

Conclusion

Although the ultimate scope and effects of the 2017 Tax Bill will continue to unfold, the most significant change from a transfer tax and estate planning perspective is the doubling of the estate, gift and generation-skipping transfer tax exemptions to approximately US$11.2 million beginning on January 1, 2018.

For questions or concerns about tax planning, please contact us immediately at 817.638.9016. Don’t wait until you’re facing an enormous tax bill!