Why You Need a LadyBird Deed Now

Ladybird deeds are a crucial part of elder law planning and Medicaid planning. If you are on Medicaid or think you might be soon, you need a ladybird today.

What is a ladybird deed? It’s a deed where the owner of the property deeds his or her interest in the property to someone else at the owner’s death. 

Why would someone want a ladybird deed? Two reasons:

  1. A ladybird deed allows you to avoid going through probate for the property covered in the deed
  2. A ladybird deed protects your property against the state or a governmental agency trying to recover against your property for health care costs.
  3. Other great benefits of ladybird deeds:
  •   You can always revoke the deed and take back the transfer

  •   Other family members may be rewarded for helping the client by a change of estate plan implemented simply by signing and recording a new Transfer on Death Deed.

  •   If someone in the family falls on hard times an needs extra help, the estate plan can be changed with a new deed.

  •   The grantor reserves the right to sell or mortgage the property without consent of the grantee.

  •  If creditors of a remainder owner threaten action affecting the property, the grantor can protect his or her interests by appointing the remainder to someone else. This would not be a fraudulent transfer if the life tenants are not “debtors” as to the creditors.

  •  The deed creates no Medicaid transfer penalty; and at the death of the grantor, title will pass under such a deed outside the grantor’s probate estate and will therefore not be subject to Texas estate recovery under the current state law.

    Call us today at 817.638.9016 to discuss ladybird deed and other ways to protect your property from the state and from probate.

Providing for Special Needs Kids–Using Special Needs Trusts

As the mom or dad of a special needs child, your heart and hands are already full. With a Special Needs Trust, your child continues receiving government benefits and enjoys an enhanced life–with the trust funds paying for the extras including:

  • Paying you for providing care to your child
  • Paying for fun trips and activities for your child
  • Setting aside savings for your child’s future needs

To schedule an appointment with Travis Weaver, attorney, or Rick Weaver, attorney, about creating a Special Needs Trust, call 817-638-9016. To learn more about this essential legal tool, check out our extensive Q & A below: 

Why is a Special Needs Trust essential?

If you leave money or property directly to your special needs child, either in a will or through intestacy (dying without a will), the inheritance your child receives will endanger his or her ability to receive benefits under government programs such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid.

What is a Special Needs Trust?

A Special Needs Trust, also known as a Supplemental Needs Trust, is created to hold cash or property for your special needs child. Funds from the trust can be used to help your special needs child–yet still allow the child to receive government benefits like Medicaid or SSI. As described earlier, if the child owns these assets outright, he or she may not qualify for government benefits. 

Funds from the Special Needs Trust may also be used to pay yourself and other family members for caregiving duties. This helps make up for a parent’s lost income. Since many special needs children require around-the-clock care, making it impossible for a parent to hold a job, this benefit may help relieve financial stress and ensure your child receives the best possible care–from you.  

What does my special needs child gain with a Special Needs Trust? 

A properly drafted and executed Special Needs Trust shelters assets for a special needs child or other disabled person, while allowing the child to benefit from government programs offering support to disabled individuals. 

Your special needs child may be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Insurance (SSD), Medicare and Medicaid. Consider this brief summary about qualifying for these programs:

  • SSI is a needs-based program available if certain income and resource limitations are met.
  • In most states including Texas, people receiving SSI are automatically entitled to Medicaid.
  • To qualify for SSI and Medicaid, a single person must own less than $2,000 of countable assets.
  • Those with countable assets greater than $2,000 can lose their eligibility for benefits. 

Won’t any trust work? Unfortunately, no. 

Here’s why — support trusts (most common trusts are support trusts), which direct that funds be used for the health, welfare, and support of a beneficiary like a special needs child, will usually disqualify a the child from receiving government benefits. This is because the assets in a support trust are counted as the child’s resources.

A Special Needs Trust allows a parent (the trustee) to use trust funds to add to, not replace, the government benefits for which your special needs child qualifies.

Here’s how it works: 

  • To maintain eligibility for needs-based support, your special needs child (the beneficiary) cannot have control over the assets in the Special Needs Trust.
  • Your special needs child cannot manage the assets, have the right to demand distributions of income or property from the trust, name the Trustee or change the terms of the Special Needs Trust.
  • The use of the Special Needs Trust’s assets for the benefit of a special needs child is determined by the parent (Trustee).
  • Because your special needs child (the beneficiary) does not have a claim to the assets in the trust, this means the trust assets are not countable resources and do not affect the special needs child’s eligibility for benefits.
  • As a result, the special needs child continues receiving government benefits, while still enjoying the benefits of the funds or property in the trust–for things like travel, entertainment, and other  supplemental needs that may greatly enhance your child’s quality of life. 

Who can serve as a trustee of a Special Needs Trust? 

  • The Trustee can be a parent, family member, friend, or private professional trustee.
  • In the case of a self-settled special needs trust, the person making the gift to create the trust can also serve as trustee. A self-settled special needs trust requires a payback provision for any governmental benefits received. All other special needs trusts do not require such payback provisions. 

Want to schedule an appointment to talk with us about setting up a special needs trust? Call Travis Weaver, attorney, or Rick Weaver, attorney, today at 817.638.9016. 

Medicaid Gifts and Trusts

How Do Assets and Trusts Impact Medicaid Eligibility?

Medicaid eligibility requires minimal personal assets.

Your health care needs will increase as you age.

That is a given.

With this increase, your health care bills will also increase.

That is a given.

Some people turn to Medicaid for financial assistance.

That is not such a given.

What is Medicaid?

Medicaid is a government program managed by states to help with medical and long-term care costs.

It is needs-based, meaning individuals must qualify financially for eligibility.

In order to prevent individuals from merely making transfers of their property, either outright or in trust, to qualify for Medicaid, there is a penalty period imposed on transfers made within five years of applying for Medicaid. 

If an individual establishes a trust using some of his or her own funds, where the individual is the sole beneficiary or one beneficiary in a pool of beneficiaries, the trust may be considered a resource for Medicaid purposes.

This is particularly true if the trust can be revoked — a revocable trust– and the assets can be pulled back into the name of the Medicaid applicant, she said.

Third Party Trust

If the trust is created by a third party, with third party funds, for the benefit of the Medicaid applicant, then the answer would depend on the specific terms of the trust and whether or not the settlor — the person who created the trust — is the spouse of the Medicaid applicant.

That’s because income and asset limitations are imposed on the community spouse in order for the applicant spouse to qualify for Medicaid.

The state may also have the right of recovery against the estate of a deceased Medicaid recipient for Medicaid benefits paid to such individual during his or her lifetime. Always use a ladybird deed or a transfer on death deed for real property.

For starters, you cannot simply transfer (gift) assets to your loved ones to become eligible.

In fact, the transfers would need to occur more than five years before the Medicaid application.

Work with an experienced elder law attorney to determine if Medicaid is a viable option for you.

Contact us at 817.638.9016 

Elder Law 101: Nursing Home Care vs. Assisted Living

How Do Nursing Homes Differ from Assisted Living

Nursing home lawyers provide assistance in making an advanced plan to get you care required as you get older or if you experience illnesses or injuries that make you unable to care for yourself any longer.  

As you experience age-related sickness or the affects of illness, there is a substantial chance you will some day require care in an institutional care environment.  

In fact, as Wall Street Journal explains, more than 70 percent of people who reach the age of 65 will require nursing home care at some point in the future.  

You’ll need to make sure you are prepared to move to the right environment — and to pay for the care you require.

Most nursing homes cost upwards of $5,000 a month for care.

The Weaver Firm attorneys can help you understand your options for nursing home care or other care you might require.

In particular, you should consider the differences between nursing homes and assisted living facilities so you can make a fully informed choice regarding which environment is right for you.

If you want help in understanding the different options for senior living when you cannot live alone any longer, you can give us a call at any time to talk with nursing home lawyers at our firm.

Assisted Living vs. Nursing Homes

Assisted living and nursing homes both provide an option for seniors who can no longer live independently but as the New York Times explains, there are important differences.

Assisted Living Facilities

Assisted living facilities generally provide a more home-like environment while nursing homes have a more institutional or hospital-like feel.

These homes may involve seniors living more independently in their own rooms or their own apartments, while nursing homes generally provide semi-private or private rooms with much less privacy and autonomy than assisted living facilities offer.

While an assisted living facility can feel more like living independently for seniors, this independence makes assisted living facilities unsuitable for many seniors who require more hands-on help.  

Assisted living facilities may offer housekeeping services, meals, activities, and some help getting medical care, assisted living facilities typically do not provide the same level of supportive services that a nursing home does. 

The New York Times also indicates that nursing homes are more heavily regulated than assisted living facilities. 

Assisted living facilities are covered by VA aid and attendance. The rules for this program are complex but are not nearly as intense as Medicaid rules.

Some facilities have an assisted living section and a nursing home care section for seniors who are attracted to the idea of assisted living but who may need nursing home care in the future.

If you think this could be an option, you should make sure to find out what the rules are for when and how different kinds of care can be paid for. 

Getting Help from Nursing Home Lawyers

How much does it cost to stay in a nursing home?

The average cost of a private room in a nursing home is more than $90,000 a year.

What are ways to pay for a nursing home stay?

There are four main ways to pay for a nursing home stay:

  1. Cash out of your pocket
  2. Medicaid
  3. Private Long Term Care Insurance
  4. Medicare

How does Medicaid pay?

Medicaid is a joint federal and state government program that helps people with low income and little assets pay for their nursing home cost.

Generally, to be eligible for Medicaid, your income and asset levels can’t exceed levels set forth in your state.

Medicaid officials will “look back” at your financial information over a certain number of years to determine if you have been getting rid of property in order to receive Medicaid.

However, if you have assets over the allowable level, you are permitted to “spend down” or decrease your assets before you receive Medicaid.

Typical spend down costs include medical expenses, mortgages and other debts, and funeral expenses.

Also, your house and car are generally not counted against you for qualification purposes, and therefore don’t have to be spent down.

States vary in their eligibility requirements, so you should check with your state social services office or an elder law attorney for specific information.

Also, keep in mind that not all nursing homes accept Medicaid, so you’ll need to ask about a particular nursing home’s policy. 

Nursing home lawyers at the Weaver Firm can provide assistance with the process of making a plan to get nursing home care or to get care in an assisted living community.

We can also provide guidance on reviewing nursing home facilities and assisted living facilities to find the right care environment for your particular circumstances.

Because the costs of care can be expensive and are not covered by Medicare or by most private insurance, we also provide assistance with the creation of a Medicaid plan so you can protect assets while getting Medicaid to cover the costs of your care. 

Contact us today at 817.638.9016 or RWeaver@weaverlegal.net

VA Aid and Attendance: Rewarding Our Servicemen and Servicewomen

The VA Pension benefit numbers just came out, increasing 2% for those veterans who qualify.

The VA has many different programs, but two dealing with monthly payments.

The first program for monthly payments is called “Compensation,” which helps those injured while serving their country.

The second program is called “Pension,” which generally provides payments to help veterans and their dependents with high medical costs (very useful in the elder law arena). This is the area we primarily deal with in our practice. Both of our attorneys are certified VA planning attorneys.

The following represents the maximum payments available under the Pension program.

Veteran with One Dependent

Basic Pension:                           $1,436/m

Housebound:                             $1,679/m

Aid and Attendance:                 $2,169/m

Single Veteran

Basic Pension:                          $1,096/m

Housebound:                            $1,340/m  

Aid and Attendance:                $1,829/m

Surviving Spouse of Wartime Veteran

Basic Pension:                         $ 735/m

Housebound:                           $ 898/m

Aid and Attendance:               $1,176/m

This increase is good news for anyone looking to help an elderly or disabled veteran who served in an applicable time of war.

How can a veteran use these benefits?

Pension benefits are best used to help pay for an elderly or disabled veteran’s out-of-pocket medical costs. 

For example:

Mom, age 78, is the unmarried surviving spouse of a wartime veteran. Mom needs in-home care to assist with her activities of daily living (ADLs) due to her failing health. In this scenario, mom may qualify for up to $1,176/m to assist with her in-home care costs.

Pension benefits can also be used to pay for the cost of an assisted living facility as well. 

Call today to schedule a VA planning meeting with one of our attorneys. Don’t leave money on the table.

817.638.9016 or RWeaver@weaverlegal.net

Your Income Will NOT Disqualify You From Medicaid Nursing Home Benefits

hammer breaking a piggy bank

How a “Miller Trust” Works As a Tool–
Breaking Open Qualification for Medicaid Nursing Home Benefits

In Texas, if your income is more than the monthly amount Medicaid permits, special rules allow you to re-direct your income to a legal tool called a Miller Trust or Qualified Income Trust (QIT).  This legal planning document allows you to meet income eligibility rules for Medicaid nursing home benefits.  If you don’t set up this type of trust,  your income cannot be more $2,250 per month in order to meet Medicaid’s 2018 eligibility requirements. 

The document is known as a“Miller Trust” for the family that brought the court action resulting in this planning solution for families.

Big thing to remember: income will never disqualify you for Medicaid nursing home benefits in Texas.

How Qualified Income Trusts or Miller Trusts Work In Texas

A Qualified Income Trust or “Miller Trust” is set up for one reason and one reason only. In it’s most basic form, you use this tool to gain income eligibility for Medicaid nursing home care by depositing your income into a checking account titled in the trust name.

Here’s how it works–

  • The trust is used to process your income as a Medicaid applicant, so that you meet Medicaid’s income rules ($2,250 per month in 2018). The trust must follow special rules for managing the monthly income of the person seeking Medicaid’s help.
  • The instructions contained within the document make up the trust. Only income may be deposited into these types of trusts. The trust bank account is prohibited from accepting anything other than income. That is why these are also generically referred to as income trusts.
  • Regulations require depositing income into a “Miller Trust” checking account authorized by the trust. Rather than using an existing account, I recommend fresh bank accounts with a zero balance. You can use a current account, but it’s too risky. In our practice we always help clients set up a new account.
  • When deciding eligibility, the Medicaid caseworker ignores the income deposited into the Miller Trust bank account. Using this approach reduces countable income. The apparent income reduction helps you meet the strict income rules.
  • To wrap up, Medicaid policy limits the monthly income you can receive and still qualify for nursing home benefits. The Federal government adjusts this upper limit for inflation each year.  In 2018, the monthly limit for income is $2,250. If your income exceeds the limit, special rules allow this income to be put into a Qualified Income Trust (QIT) or “Miller Trust.”

How Your Income Flows Through the Trust

A “Miller Trust”or Qualified Income Trust (QIT) helps you qualify for Medicaid in Texas–but it doesn’t shelter income. Money deposited into the trust bank account typically flows out of the trust to pay the nursing home. It’s designed to cover part of the care costs. The balance of the nursing home payment comes from Medicaid. If any money remains in the trust after death, the state keeps it to help defray their costs. 

Here’s an Real-life Example of How a “Miller Trust” works in Texas

Let’s say your mom needs nursing home care. She gets a monthly Social Security payment of $2,400. Her income exceeds the Medicaid eligibility limit of $2,250 for a single person, but is not enough to pay for the care she needs. The rules say that she doesn’t qualify for Medicaid, but the Miller Trust provides a workaround. Here are the steps we recommend for qualifying for Medicaid nursing home benefits in this example–

  1. Hire an attorney. The first step is to hire an attorney to create a Medicaid Qualified Income Trust or “Miller Trust.”  At Weaver Firm-Attorneys , we focus  on “Miller Trusts” and have for more than two decades
  2. Deposit mom’s Social Security check into the account. This drops the amount of income the state counts against her eligibility. Her Social Security income will pay part of her care. Medicaid makes up the difference. 
  3. The Medicaid agency figures out how much of the long term care costs an individual must pay. They add up the amount of income received each month. From that they allow payments for health insurance premiums. Examples include premiums for Medicare Part B, Prescription Drug plans, group retirement health insurance and dental coverage.
  4. Payment of medical expenses not otherwise covered by Medicare and Medicaid is also allowed from through the trust. The trustee (the person managing the trust) cannot use trust funds for any other purpose–except those allowed by Medicaid. 
  5. Your mom keep $60 out of the $2,400 for her personal needs.  
  6. If your mom is married, the trust may be able to distribute part of the income to the spouse.  This allotment is called the Minimum Monthly Maintenance Needs Allowance. The size of this monthly allowance is determined by the Spousal Income Protection rules. For 2018, the largest allocation in Texas is $3,090 per month.
  7. The trust will typically distribute all deposited funds each month to cover the items detailed above. There is little chance any money will grow in the trust. It is rare for a Medicaid recipient to die with a balance left in the qualified income trust account. If it happens, the state can recover what it spent on the applicant’s care. After the state is repaid, the trustee can distribute the rest to beneficiaries named in the document.

Setting up and managing a Miller Trust is not a “do-it-yourself” project. The rules are too complicated. 

Set up the wrong way, you face a real risk of losing thousands of dollars’ worth of benefits. Bear in mind once you lose those benefits, they are lost to you forever. If you have income that’s too high to qualify for Medicaid, a Qualifying Income Trust makes sense.

Call 817-638-9016 for an appointment today with Rick Weaver, attorney, or Travis Weaver, attorney, for guidance in setting up a “Miller Trust.” If you don’t call us, find another experienced attorney to assist you. A skilled attorney will prepare the specific instructions needed for the trust. You’ll get advice on how the trust should be set up and how to fund it. It’s the best way to avoid the pitfalls and get all the benefits out of “Miller Trusts” or Qualified Income Trusts in Texas.

The Weaver Firm – Attorneys
817.638.9016 

How A Lady Bird Deed, Nursing Home Medicaid Benefits, & Your Home Are Important

bird and birdhouse

A “Lady Bird” deed preserves the homeowner’s ability to immediately qualify for Medicaid benefits including payment for nursing home care.

Here’s how it works:  Transfers of assets within a “look-back” period may disqualify Medicaid applicants from immediately qualifying for benefits—but creating a Lady Bird deed, also called an enhanced life estate deed, is not considered a transfer for Medicaid purposes because the homeowner retains the right to sell the property or revoke the deed. No gift is ever made.

This deed is nicknamed “Lady Bird” because the Florida attorney who first drafted the deed used the name in his example. Sorry, Texans, we don’t get to claim this Ladybird.

What are the legal details?

A Lady Bird deed, technically called an enhanced life estate deed, allows a property owner to transfer a remainder interest in a home to the beneficiaries named in the deed, while reserving a life estate (a right to occupy and use the property during his or her lifetime) The grantor (or person who creates the deed) also keeps the right to sell or mortgage the property, change the remainder beneficiaries at any time, or cancel the deed altogether.

If the owner dies without revoking the deed, the property passes outright to the remainder beneficiaries without going to court.

Pretty neat.

How is an enhanced life estate deed different from a traditional life estate deed?

With both the enhanced life estate deed and the traditional life estate deed, a property owner transfers a remainder interest in the property to the ultimate beneficiaries and retains a life estate. However, a property owner using a traditional life estate deed does not reserve the right to sell or give away the land without the consent of the remainder beneficiaries.

The enhanced life estate deed allows the property owner to reserve those rights. That’s why it’s enhanced I guess.

Plenty of benefits to enhanced life estate deeds

Enhanced life estate deeds offer many advantages over traditional life estate deeds:

  1. They preserve the homeowners ability to immediately qualify for Medicaid benefits. Transfers of assets within a “look-back” period may disqualify applicants from immediately qualifying for benefits. However, executing an enhanced life estate deed is not considered a transfer for Medicaid purposes because the homeowner retains the right to sell the property or revoke the deed. No gift is ever made.
  2. They provide homeowner the flexibility to change the remainder beneficiaries at any time.
  3. They allow the homeowner to sell or mortgage the property without the consent of the remainder beneficiaries.
  4. They protect the property from the creditors of the remainder beneficiaries during the homeowner’s lifetime.
  5. Because the owner of the property retains the right to take back the property during his or her lifetime, the transfer will not count as a gift for federal gift tax purposes.

Beneficiaries receive a stepped-up basis

Because property will remain a part of the grantor’s estate, the cost basis of a property transferred using an enhanced life estate deed would be “stepped-up” to the value of the house on the date of death. This may significantly reduce the amount of capital gains taxes owed when the property is sold.

Can a trust be a beneficiary? 

Yes, a trust can also be a beneficiary. If you love your family but don’t want them to have property outright for whatever reason, sometimes we create a revocable trust to hold the property.

Need help creating a Lady Bird deed or qualifying for Medicaid nursing home benefits? Give us a call at Weaver Firm – Attorneys at 817-638-9016 to schedule an appointment. 

Travis Weaver, Attorney

Travis Weaver, Attorney

What Are the Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease?

The symptoms of Alzheimer’s and dementia develop slowly over a number of years Sometimes these signs are mistaken for normal, age-related mental decline instead of the result of a more serious problem.

Because the symptoms progress slowly, it’s easy for loved one’s to deny they even exist until an event happens that is so uncharacteristic or bizarre that the symptoms become undeniable.

We’ve seen this type of denial in our family.

Look for the below-mentioned signs and consider a planning meeting with our attorneys before the situation deteriorates beyond repair.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, the following are ten warning signs of Alzheimer’s:

  1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life, especially newly-learned information. Early symptoms include repeatedly asking the same questions, and increasingly relying on memory aids, such as notes, to recall routine tasks.
  2. Challenges in planning or solving problems. The onset of Alzheimer’s can make it difficult keep track of finances, and plan and cook meals. Sometimes, people give gifts or make unusual purchases.
  3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, work, or leisure, such as driving to a familiar location or recalling the rules of a game.
  4. Disorientation of time or place. Those with Alzheimer’s can experience confusion about where they are, how they got there, or what day it is.
  5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships, such as depth perception. This leads to people tripping on stairs or ledges and can cause physical harm.
  6. New problems with words in speaking or writing. People with Alzheimer’s struggle with remembering the right word or use the wrong word to describe familiar objects. Sometimes, people will avoid discussing certain issues or avoid situations altogether to cover up these signs.
  7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps to locate them. This includes keys and medications.
  8. Poor or impaired judgment. Those with Alzheimer’s may be more prone to give away large sums of money to telemarketers, dress inappropriately, or keep up with personal hygiene. They may even forget to eat for days at a time.
  9. Withdrawal from work or social activities.
  10. Changes in mood and personality. Symptoms can include mood swings, anxiety and delusions.

Our recommendations if a loved one is experiencing these symptoms:

The Alzheimer’s Association recommends seeing a doctor right away if you or someone you love experiences any of these symptoms because early diagnosis and treatment can delay the progression of Alzheimer’s.

In our pre-planning session, we discuss estate planning documents to protect your loved ones and options for long term care including Medicaid and VA planning.

Schedule a meeting today. 817.638.9016 or RWeaver@weaverlegal.net

Nursing Home vs. Assisted Living: Who They Help

group photo canoeing down riverLawyers with experience in nursing home qualification, including those at the Weaver Firm, provide assistance in creating an advanced plan to get care you require as you get older or if you experience illnesses or injuries that make you unable to care for yourself any longer.  

As you experience age-related illness, there is a substantial chance you will some day require care in an institutional care environment. In fact, as Wall Street Journal explains, more than 70 percent of people who reach the age of 65 will require nursing home care at some point in the future.  

Start planning now. Medicaid has a five year loopback period for gifts. VA Aid and Attendance has NO LOOKBACK period as of this post, but changes are coming.

An attorney can help you to understand your options for nursing home care or other types of care

In particular, you should consider the differences between nursing homes and assisted living facilities so you can make a fully informed choice regarding which environment is right for you.

Assisted living vs. nursing home long-term care

Assisted living facilities and nursing homes both provide an option for seniors who can no longer live independently. But, as the New York Times explains, there are important differences:

  • Assisted living facilities generally provide a more home-like environment while nursing homes have a more institutional or hospital-like feel.  
  • Assisted living facilities involve seniors living more independently in their own rooms or their own apartments
  • Nursing homes generally provide semi-private or private rooms with much less privacy and autonomy than assisted living facilities offer.
  • Assisted living facility may offer housekeeping services, meals, activities, and some help getting medical care, assisted living facilities typically do not provide the same level of supportive services that a nursing home does. 

The New York Times also indicates that nursing homes are more heavily regulated than assisted living facilities.

Who pays for nursing home or other long-term care? 

  • Medicaid will cover the costs of nursing home care for eligible seniors who can qualify for means-tested benefits.
  • Assisted living facilities are often not covered by Medicaid or any other kind of insurance policy.
  • Assisted living facilities ARE covered by VA aid and attendance if you or your spouse was a veteran during time of war.
  • Some facilities have an assisted living section and a nursing home care section for seniors who are attracted to the idea of assisted living but who may need nursing home care in the future.

Getting help from nursing home lawyers

Because the costs of care are expensive and are not covered by Medicare or by most private insurance, our attorneys at the Weaver Firm provide assistance with the creation of a Medicaid or VA Aid and Attendance plan so you can protect assets while getting Medicaid or VA to cover the costs of your care.

Call 817-638-9016 today to schedule a meeting with Weaver Firm attorneys to review your options for long-term care.

Rick Weaver to Speak at Fort Worth Business and Estates Council

Do you have plans for November 16, around noon? No? Well you do now! Rick Weaver (of the Weaver Firm) and Earl Davidson are speaking on Discovering Government Benefits for the Elderly at the Fort Worth Business and Estates Council at the City Club in Fort Worth. Mr. Weaver and Mr. Davidson will touch on issues such as Medicaid for long term care and nursing homes, Veterans Aid and Attendance benefits for those who served our Country, and long term care insurance for those who might need it. The average cost of a nursing home is over $7,000.00 per month in 2017! Come hear these two speakers tell you everything you need to know about long term care planning. If you aren’t a member of the Tarrant County Bar Association and would like more information about long term care planning, schedule an appointment with the Weaver Firm today.

Sign up below

https://members.tarrantbar.org/calendar/signup/NTQwOQ==